Document Library

Child & Adolescent Development & Empowerment

These documents pertain to child and adolescent development and empowerment, and how to apply this knowledge to programs, activities, and participants. 

 

Adolescents and Youth Culture Positive Youth Development
Child Development Youth Leadership and Governance
Personal Development and Life Skills

 


 

Adolescents and Youth Culture

The 2013 Millennial Impact Report. (2013). This report provides a guide for organizations to better understand the millennial generation, immerse them in the cause, and maximize the impact of their interest, time, and giving. The data was gathered from an online survey distributed to millennials through 14 research partners.

Adolescent Health Strategic Planning Guide. (2010). Improving the Health of Youth - A Guide for State-Level Strategic Planning and Action A guide designed to provide tools and practical ideas for developing and implementing an adolescent health strategic plan. It draw from the strategic planning field and the practical experience of state public health professionals who have developed and implemented adolescent health plans.

Adolescent Literacy Development in Out-of-School Time. A Practitioner's Guidebook. (2011). Carnegie Corporation's Advancing Literacy program is dedicated to the issues of adolescent literacy and research, policy, and practice that focus on the reading and writing competencies of middle and high school students. Advancing Literacy reports and other publications are designed to encourage local and national discussion, explore promising ideas and incubate models of practice, but do not necessarily represent the recommendations of the Corporation. For more information, visit: www.carnegie.org/literacy

Adolescent Well-Being after Experiencing Family Homelessness. (June 2016) This is the second in a series of research briefs that draws on the Family Options Study to inform HHS and HHS grantees as they carry out their special responsibilities for preventing and ending the homelessness of families, children, and youth. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).

Assessing What Kids Think About Themselves: A Guide to Adolescent Self-Concept for Out-of-School Time Program Practitioners .(2008). This is a guide for practitioners to assess OST participants’ self-concept, to aid in creating supportive and appropriate programming for students.  The article also explains the idea of self-concept, and the purpose of understanding young people’s awareness of themselves.

After School Grows Up: Helping Teens Prepare for the Future. (2009). This commentary takes readers on a cross-country tour of after-school innovation – from northern and southern California to Chicago, New York and New Hampshire.

E-Cigarette Use Among Youth and Young Adults: A Report of the Surgeon General. (2016) This report confirms that the use of electronic cigarettes is growing rapidly among American youth and young adults. The findings from this report reinforce the need to support evidence-based programs to prevent youth and young adults from using tobacco in any form, including e-cigarettes. US Department of Health and Human Services.

Engaging Families to Boost Teens' After-School Enrollment: Practical Tips from the Beacons Experience. (2009). Contrary to the myth that young teens don't want their parents around, programs that engage the whole family help boost recruitment, participation and retention. In this article to Connect For Kids, the Youth Development Institute has the story and practical tips.

Engaging Older Youth: Program and City-Level Strategies to Support Sustained Participation in Out-of-School Time. (2010). This report details the findings from a joint Public/Private Ventures-Harvard Family Research Project study that examined the practices and structural features of almost 200 out-of-school-time programs and identified the characteristics most successful in retaining older youth.

Evaluation of the New York City Out-of-School Time Initiative: Implementation of Programs for High School Youth. (2009). This report prepared by Policy Studies Associates for the New York Department of Youth and Community Development presents data on New York City's ambitious out-of-school time teen program and findings on participant engagement.

Expanding Options City Roles in Creating High School Alternatives for Struggling Students. A report on the Helping Municipal Leaders Expand Options and Alternatives for High School Project. City leaders and their federal, state and school district counterparts must combine efforts to reinvent and overhaul the high school experience to better prepare students for the challenges and opportunities of the 21st century.

Five Student Stereotypes That are Wrong. (2012). Among the misconceptions people have are that all students are tech-savvy and are disengaged, or don't care about education or the world around them, according to a survey. Other misconceptions are that students are not good at communicating, low-income students can't succeed and students are not spending time outdoors.

Helping Low-Income Urban Youth Make the Transition to Early Adulthood: A Retrospective Study of the YMCA Youth Institute. (2016) The pilot qualitative study explores the perspectives of young adults on the effect of their participation in the Youth Institute and suggests implications for other high school OST programs. Afterschool Matters.

 

Helping Older Youth Succeed Through Expanded Learning Opportunities. (2011). Sustaining older youth's interest in learning is particularly critical given that nearly one in four students fails to graduate from high school on time. Research indicates that regular participation in quality expanded learning opportunities (ELOs) can help keep older youth on a positive academic trajectory and support their successful graduation and transition into college and/or career. 

How Out-of-School Time Program Quality is Related to Adolescent Outcomes, (2010). Program Quality Matters for Adolescent Outcomes. A new Child Trends research brief finds positive outcomes for adolescents in high-quality out-of-school time programs, but no significant differences between adolescents in low-quality programs and those not in a program at all. The brief is based on data from the Every Child Every Promise survey commissioned by the America's Promise Alliance.

Improving the Quality of Expanded Learning Opportunities (ELOs) Serving Older Youth. (2009). This forum brief highlights research that examines the effects of the Youth Program Quality Assessment, a research-validated tool designed to evaluate and improve the quality of ELOs serving adolescents, and how the assessment tool is being used at state and local levels to improve the quality of ELOs. 

Inner City Truth: An Urban Youth Lifestyle Study II. (2009). This report is based on a 100+ question survey conducted with 1,500 African American and Hispanic inner-city youth ages 15 to 20 in six cities.  It provides an insider's view of new and under-the-radar trends in inner-city, hip-hop culture, a leading indicator for mainstream and global trends.

Learning Around the Clock: Benefits of Expanded Learning Opportunities for Older Youth. (2009). This is an easy-to-read guide designed to help national, state, and local policymakers and practitioners better understand the wide-array of benefits ELOs provide and the programmatic and structural elements of successful ELOs.

Making Every Day Count: Boys & Girls Clubs' Role in Promoting Positive Outcomes for Teens. (2009). The third in a series of reports from P/PV's three-year study of the role Boys & Girls Clubs play in the lives of the youth they serve, Making Every Day Count examines how Club participation is related to youth's positive and healthy development in three outcome areas identified by Boys & Girls Clubs of America as central to its mission: good character and citizenship, academic success and healthy lifestyles.

Measuring Associations between Symptoms of Depression and Suicide in Adolescence and Unhealthy Romantic Relationships in Young Adulthood. (2013). Research suggests that issues related to suicide and depression in adolescence can negatively affect interpersonal relationships later in life. This article presents key findings from a Child Trends study of young adults who self-reported depressive symptoms and suicidal thoughts or attempts, and linked these results with their relationship outcomes later in life.

Motivating Young Adolescents. September 2014. Rick Wormeli offers six useful techniques on engaging middle school aged students. The article also includes twelve “demotivators” which may help inform staff development. ASCD.

New Report: 10 Principles of Effective Learning for Older Youth. (2013). Despite research that shows middle adolescence (14-18) is the time when young people begin to develop advanced and complex forms of reasoning and analysis, studies find that a number of high schoolers are disengaged, bored at school, lack direction, and leave or drop out without the skills they'll need in the workplace. This article lists 10 principles of effective learning for this age group.

New Wallace Foundation Study on Benefits of Afterschool for Teens. ( 2011). After-School Programs for High School Students - An Evaluation of After School Matters is a rigorous evaluation comparing results of teens in Chicago's After School Matters apprentice-like program to results of similar students. The evaluation finds statistically significant benefits for After School Matters students on some measures of youth development and reduced problem behaviors, but no differences in job skills or school performance.

Out-of-School Time Programs for Older Youth. (May 2011). Out-of-school programs tailored for older youth can help participants to successfully navigate their adolescence and learn new skills. This research update addresses benefits, challenges, and successful strategies of real OST programs designed specifically for older youth. Harvard Family Research Project.

Participation Over Time: (2010). Keeping Youth Engaged from Middle School to High School draws on data collected for Engaging Older Youth -a recent study from Harvard Family Research Project and Public/Private Ventures, commissioned by the Wallace Foundation-of out-of-school time programs that successfully engage older youth and the strategies they use to maintain high participation rates.

Pathways for Youth: Draft Strategic Plan for Federal Collaboration. (2013). This report is a first step to help partners address their common goals for youth, elevate strong models of youth programs, and articulate areas for future collaborative work with and for youth.

A Practitioner's Guide to Promising Practices for Recruiting and Retaining Older Youth.  (2010). Out-of-school time (OST) programs across Pennsylvania are looking for ways to improve their recruitment and retention efforts and attract older youth to their programs. This report combines results from a 2010 survey of youth programs in Pennsylvania with findings from a literature review to provide practitioners with information on best practices for recruiting and retaining older youth.

The Prevalence of Rape Myths among Middle School Students across Gender and Socioeconomic Background. (Winter 2016) A study designed to investigate the level and type of rape myths that are endorsed among middle school youth in terms of gender and socioeconomic background is reported in this paper. Implications include finding more effective ways to target male youth and that Project Equality works to lower rape myths among middle school youth. Journal of Youth Development.

Promising Afterschool High School Programs. (2009). The Southwest Educational Development Laboratory (SEDL) recently conducted a study exploring the current landscape of promising afterschool high school programs. Fact-finding included evaluations of various high school programs and phone interviews with leaders of eight promising high school afterschool programs. From their findings they identified nine characteristics common to the most successful programs.

Putting It All Together: Guiding Principles for Quality After-School Programs Serving Preteens.(2008). This online Resource Guide provides recent research and tools to help service providers strengthen their after-school programs, particularly those serving preteens.

Recruiting and Retaining Older African-American and Hispanic Boys in Afterschool Programs: What We Know and What We Still Need to Learn. (2010). While there is evidence to indicate participation in out-of-school time activities increases positive outcomes, recruiting and retaining older youth in these programs is a hard task. This report explores that question and suggests making programs relevant leads to better recruitment and retention. The report also argues that relevance should occur at both the surface level - language used, the way materials are presented, location of programs - and the deep structural level - addresses cultural, social, and historical factors that influence the participants' behavior.

Teens and Distraction: An In-Depth Look at Teens' Walking Behaviors. August 2013. This report found that one in five high school students and one in eight middle school students were observed crossing the street distracted. Students were most often texting on a phone (39 percent) or using headphones (39 percent). Girls were 1.2 times more likely than boys to be walking while distracted. Safe Kids Worldwide.  

Teens' Self-Consciousness Has Biological Basis, Study Says(2013). Many teens are concerned about what others think of them, and this self-consciousness is linked with specific body and brain responses that appear to begin and peak in adolescence. Furthermore, findings from the research study suggest that being watched elicits self-conscious emotional responses at each level of measurement.

The Benefits, Challenges, and Successful Strategies of OST Programs for Older Youth. (2011). Out-of-school time (OST) programs focused on older youth-specifically, youth in middle and high school-can help participants successfully navigate their adolescence and learn new skills well into their teens. OST programs can also help prepare older youth for a variety of new roles that they will assume as they enter college and the workforce. However, some programs struggle to implement high-quality services, recruit and retain older youth, and reach optimal outcomes.

Untangling Hip-Hop for The Classroom. (2011). Education can shape realities, not just tell stories. It can prepare us for life's expected and unexpected journeys, and it can give us a foundation to cope with the lows and gloom and accept the highs graciously. It is incumbent upon teachers to reach out to our students and to understand where they are coming from so as to make the most of time in the classroom.

Using Media to Promote Adolescent Well-Being. (2008). Adolescent media use has exploded. Parents are worried that teens are drowning in messages about sex, smoking, drinking, consumer goods, and a host of other behaviors and products that threaten their health and well-being. This brief advocates fighting fire with fire by creative use of media to provide youth with positive messages that counteract the negative and potentially damaging messages to which they are so frequently exposed.

What Works for Older Youth During the Transition to Adulthood. (2010). This new fact sheet from Child Trends examines the role that programs for older youth can play in promoting positive development and subsequent self-sufficiency in adulthood. Mentoring programs, employment success and educational improvement are examined. The authors recommend further research to rigorously evaluate best practices for older youth.

Why Teens are Not Involved in Out-of-School Time Programs: The Youth Perspective. (2009). This July 2009 brief from Child Trends presents findings from a recent Child Trends roundtable discussion during which youth identified barriers to their participation in OST programs, such as programs that are located in unsafe or unfamiliar neighborhoods and program participation being perceived in a negative light by parents and/or peers.

Youth Education and the Role of Society. (2013). In his new book, the director of the doctoral program and chair of the research council at the Erikson Institute in Chicago makes the case for giving every high school student a chance to learn outside of schools as they're currently configured. In this Q & A with TASC, Robert Halpern briefly explains why that's important.

Top

 

 


 

 

Child Development

25 Things Research Says About Child Development. (2014).  Child Trends presents research findings gathered since the organization’s inception 25 years ago.  This easy-to-read publication clearly reviews factors contributing to healthy development in children. Child Trends.

Birth Through Eight State Policy Framework: Research At A Glance - Revised. (November 2015) Research at a Glance provides an overview of the evidence base for the policy choices in the Framework, summarizing the factors that contribute to, and sustain, the healthy growth and development of young children. Child Trends.

 

Books Like Me: Engaging the Community in the Intentional Selection of Culturally Relevant Children's Literature. (January 2015).  Providing culturally relevant literature for young people has been shown to improve comprehension and engagement. This publication explores ways to engage community members in selecting culturally rich and appropriate texts for students. Childhood Education.

Can Teacher Training in Classroom Management Make a Difference for Children's Experiences in Preschool? (2009). According to this report, evidence suggests that improving young children's healthy emotional and behavioral development is both an important outcome in its own right and can also be a pathway to improved academic achievement.

Don't show, don't tell? (2011). Cognitive scientists find that when teaching young children, there is a trade-off between direct instruction and independent exploration. A study by MIT researchers and colleagues compared the behavior of children given a novel toy under four different conditions, finding that children expressly taught one of its functions played with the toy for less time and discovered fewer things to do with it than children in the other three scenarios.

Educating the Whole Child Engaging the Whole School: Guidelines and Resources for Social and Emotional Development and Learning (SEDL) in New York State. (2011). The purpose in issuing voluntary Social and Emotional Development and Learning (SEDL) Guidelines is to offer school districts compelling information, example and evidence of SEDL in elementary and secondary school education programs.NYS Board of Regents.

Five Student Stereotypes That are Wrong. (2012). Among the misconceptions people have are that all students are tech-savvy and are disengaged, or don't care about education or the world around them, according to a survey. Other misconceptions are that students are not good at communicating, low-income students can't succeed and students are not spending time outdoors.

Foundations for Young Adult Success: A Developmental Framework. (June 2015) The report synthesizes knowledge from the fields of youth development, psychology, sociology, education and the cognitive sciences; it describes what children need to grow and learn, and how adults can foster their development in ways that lead to college and career success, healthy relationships and engaged citizenship. University of Chicago Consortium on Chicago School Research.

 

How Much Can High-Quality Universal Pre-K Reduce Achievement Gaps? (April 2016) Research suggests that participation in a high-quality early childhood education program can enhance children's development, reduce achievement gaps at kindergarten entry, and even have long-term benefits for children's school trajectories. Center for American Progress.

Literacy Promotion: An Essential Component of Primary Care Pediatric. June 2014. Reading regularly with young children stimulates optimal patterns of brain development and strengthens parent-child relationships at a critical time in child development, which, in turn, builds language, literacy, and social-emotional skills that last a lifetime. Pediatrics.

Measuring Elementary School Students' Social and Emotional Skills. August 2014. This report describes the work undertaken by the Tauck Family Foundation and Child Trends, a national leader in measuring children's development and well-being, and provides the results of that work. The primary goal was to create tools that the Foundation's investees could use to assess and monitor the extent to which the organizations are improving low-income students' social and emotional skills associated with success in school and life. Child Trends.  

Panel Says Ed. Schools Overlook Developmental Science. (2010). Education programs should more explicitly train teacher candidates in the rudiments of developmental science, and need policy support from states and the federal government to do so, asserts a report released by a panel convened by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education.

Point of Entry: The Preschool-to-Prison Pipeline. (October 2015) This report highlights the trends around preschool discipline, and offers recommendations and approaches to increase the protective factors available to ensure that young children stay in school and reap the full benefits of early learning while simultaneously supporting schools and teachers to actively resist the criminalization of African American youth. Center for American Progress.

 

Preparing Youth to Thrive: Promising Practices in Social & Emotional Learning. (January 2016) The Field Guide sheds new light on how programs can embed social and emotional learning (SEL) into any program serving teens. Susan Crown Exchange (SCE).

Raising Safe Kids: One Stage at a Time. March 2009. Unintentional injury is the number one killer of children in the United States. Understanding the risks by developmental stage is important to help parents protect children from serious injury. Safe Kids Worldwide.    

The State of Girls: Unfinished Business. (2013). This report published by the Girl Scout Research Institute presents the key issues and major trends affecting girls' leadership and healthy development in the U.S. today. The report finds that while there is promising news for girls in areas such as their educational attainment, many girls are left behind, and not all girls are faring the same.

The State of the World's Children 2016: A Fair Chance for Every Child. (2016) This report offers data demonstrating how inequity imperils millions of children and threatens the future of the world. UNICEF.

 

Suicide in Elementary School-Aged Children and Early Adolescents. (September 2016) The objectives of this study were to describe characteristics and precipitating circumstances of suicide in elementary school-aged children relative to early adolescent decedents and identify potential within-group racial differences. Pediatrics.

 

Transforming the Workforce for Children Birth Through Age 8: A Unifying Foundation. (2015) The book and report explores the science of child development, particularly looking at implications for the professionals who work with children. The National Academies Press. 

 

Understanding and Addressing the Early Childhood Origins of "Mean" Behavior and Bullying: Resources for Practitioners. (August 2015) This brief first provides a summary of the developmental trajectory to bullying behavior and theories about social and environmental contributors to bullying. Child Trends.

Top

 

 


 

 

Personal Development and Life Skills

 

5 Things to Know About Youth Not Employed or in School. (February 2015). Child Trends highlights five things to be aware of when working with youth who have been out of school and unemployed. They discuss the importance of connecting disconnected youth to institutions that can help prepare them to transition to independence. Child Trends.

 

Accounting for Opportunity: A Fiscal Scan of Funding for New Orleans Opportunity Youth (August 2015) This report shows how we can link opportunity youth with academic and employment opportunities that will make the entire city prosper. Forum for Youth Investment.

 

After School Grows Up: Helping Teens Prepare for the Future. (2009). This commentary takes readers on a cross-country tour of after-school innovation – from northern and southern California to Chicago, New York and New Hampshire.

Adolescence: Developmental Tasks. (2007). Adolescence is an essential time for individual identity development. This article briefly touches on some specific areas of understanding that adolescents face and encourages adults working with these adolescents to promote this development.

After-School Programs for Delinquency Prevention: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.  (March 2015).  Though researchers found a nonsignficant association between afterschool programs (ASP) and delinquency, authors reference research demonstrating improved academic, social skill and safety outcomes for ASP attendees.  Authors urge providers to ensure ongoing program fidelity to ensure accurate assessment of program benefits.  Youth Violence and Juvenile Justice.

After-school program teaches character through inspirational movies.  (April 2015).  Big Thought, a nonprofit in Dallas, presents inspirational movie screenings through its TrueSpark afterschool program.  Students participate in engaging discussions after viewing the films, and  curriculum focuses on “positive character traits like honesty, integrity and courage.”  The Dallas Morning News.

Afterschool Recreation Programs: Workforce Development Strategies. (2011). This document examines the issues and barriers associated with labor force development in afterschool recreation programs and identifies the promising practices that may assist in addressing them.

Assessing What Kids Think About Themselves: A Guide to Adolescent Self-Concept for Out-of-School Time Program Practitioners. (2008) This is a guide for practitioners to assess OST participants’ self-concept, to aid in creating supportive and appropriate programming for students.  The article also explains the idea of self-concept, and the purpose of understanding young people’s awareness of themselves.

The Best of Both Worlds: Aligning Afterschool Programs with Youth Development Principles and Academic Standards.(2009). This guide from the Sunset Neighborhood Beacon Center (SNBC) documents SNBC’s application of California Department of Education content standards to innovative, project-based learning clubs.

Building a Perspective of Failure. (2014). This article provides some tips for encouraging students to experience failure as an important part of learning. The enumerated tips are: highlighting people who have persevered; not overreacting to failure; and offering multiple opportunities.

The Building Intentional Communities Program: Creating Engaged Critical Thinkers in Out-of-School Time. (Spring 2014). The Building Intentional Communities (BIC) program teaches afterschool providers how to use strength-based character development practices. Students are encouraged to focus on social justice, reflection, resolution, and ethics. Journal of Expanded Learning Opportunities. (p. 8).

Classroom Strategies to Foster a Growth Mindset. (2012). This blog post explores the term and concept of having a growth mindset. Individuals with a fixed mindset believe that their intelligence is simply an inborn trait--they have a certain amount, and that's that. In contrast, individuals with a growth mindset believe that they can develop their intelligence over time. Students typically begin each new school year with a mixture of anticipation and anxiety. Will their teachers be supportive or severe? Will they succeed or not? This post outlines how to give students a growth mindset to help them achieve their goals.

Creating Classrooms We Need: 8 Ways Into Inquiry Learning. (2013). Since kids can now access information from sources other than schools, "Our whole reason for showing up for school has changed, but infrastructure has stayed behind." This article provides eight suggestions on how instructors can help kids identify their own learning paths at school. Some of the recommendations for teachers include: be flexible, foster inquiry by scaffolding curiosity, embrace failure, foster joy, and don't be boring.

Crying Found to Give College Football Players a "Mental Edge." (2011).College football players who felt comfortable displaying emotion-both positive (happiness) and negative (sadness)-were found to have higher self-esteem than those who shunned emotion, according to two papers in the journal of Psychology of Men & Masculinity.

Does the Amount of Participation in Afterschool Programs Relate to Developmental Outcomes?  A Review of Literature.  (April 2010).  Researchers did not find connections between higher rates of ASP engagement and academic, behavioral or socio-emotional outcomes.  Despite this finding, high level engagement revealed positive outcomes as compared to nonparticipants.  American Journal of Community Psychology.

Filling in Thought Holes: An Invaluable Social and Emotional Learning Lesson. (2013). As the article defines it, thought holes are cognitive distortions or skewed perceptions of reality, and tend to be negative interpretations of a situation based on poor assumptions. Studies show that thought holes can provoke self-defeating ideas, which trigger self-defeating emotions, which in turn, cause self-defeating actions. Fortunately, with a brief social and emotional learning lesson, we can teach students how to fill in their thought holes and view the world in a more accurate light.

Finding Common Ground: Connecting Social-Emotional Learning During and Beyond the School Day. (May 2016) The new brief provides language and strategies to support alignment between K-12 and expanded learning programs, by cross-walking key priorities and initiatives in California that impact social-emotional learning (SEL). Partnership for Children & Youth (PCY).

 

Helping Low-Income Urban Youth Make the Transition to Early Adulthood: A Retrospective Study of the YMCA Youth Institute. (2016) The pilot qualitative study explores the perspectives of young adults on the effect of their participation in the Youth Institute and suggests implications for other high school OST programs. Afterschool Matters.

 

How Social-Emotional Learning and Development of 21st Century Competencies Support Academic Achievement. March 2014. Margaret Hilton connects character development and social skills to academics in this article. Hilton defines terms in the social and emotional learning field and also offers instruction on teaching these skills. National Association of State Boards of Education.

How to Teach Students to Evaluate Information: A Key Common Core Skill. (2013). As students engage in the instructional task of evaluating information, they refine their critical thinking skills and learn lifelong skills that prepare them for college, career, and life. Fittingly, critiquing and evaluating exercises can be embedded in many areas and activities, making it appropriate for various programs and age groups.

How Will Emotional and Relational Education for Children Make Us Globally Competitive? (2013). Given the fact that the U.S. is no longer the world leader in elementary or secondary education, this article argues for a new model of education that introduces skills such effective communication, problem solving, and peer relations, to children at an earlier age. In doing so, the author argues that such basic changes in the educational system could make a dramatic difference in the long term.

The Impact of After-School Programs that Promote Personal and Social Skills. (2007). Evidence is mounting that where and how youth spend their time outside of normal school hours has important implication for their development. However, no review has been done to systematically evaluate the impact of OST programs that attempt to enhance youths' personal and social skills, identify the nature and magnitude of the outcomes of such programs, and describe the features that characterize effective programs. This review addresses those issues.

Inscribed Upon My Wrist: Emphasizing Effort to Empower Learning. (2012). Several studies suggest a strong correlation between effort (or perseverance or grit or willpower) and achievement - not just academic success but improved life quality beyond graduation day. This article explores why this aspect of "character" is so vital, and how we can give it more intentional emphasis in education.

Investing in Dreams: A Blueprint for Designing Children's Savings Account Programs. (2015) The guide walks you step-by-step through the process of creating and launching a CSA program designed to meet the particular needs of your community. CFED.

 

Investing in Tomorrow: Helping Families Build Savings and Assets. (January 2016) This policy brief outlines practical federal policy changes that could help enable low-income families to move toward self-sufficiency and ultimately change the course of their children's lives. The Annie E. Casey Foundation. 

Making the Most of 21st CCLCs. (2012). This brief describes how states can strengthen their use of federal 21st Century Community Learning Center funds to motivate students to achieve at the levels essential for citizenship in a global economy, and to help them draw on their full capabilities so that all students can discover their greatness.

Mayo: Children Who Avoid Risk Tend to Develop Anxiety Later. (2013). According to an analysis of parent and children surveys conducted by Mayo Clinic researchers, children who avoid or flee from worrisome situations are more likely to develop anxiety. The underlying theory posits that an absence of risk and challenge in childhood leads to nervousness and anxiety later on in life. The results were based on surveys of nearly 900 children and their parents.

The Missing Piece. (2013). The central message of this report is that teachers across America understand that social and emotional learning (SEL) is critical to student success in school, work, and life. SEL involves the processes of developing competencies, including self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, relationship skills, and responsible decision-making.

National Collaborative on Adversity and Resilience Proceedings. (2014). Held in Princeton, NJ in December 2013, this report summarizes findings from the National Collaborative on Adversity and Resilience proceedings. The aim of publishing this document is to share the vision of a movement to reduce childhood adversity and promote individual and community resilience, put forth strategies for action, inspire progress in the field, and stimulate engagement among many new partners across the nation.

Nurturing Social-Emotional Learning in Out-of-School-Time. (November 2016) This report explores the Collaborative's extent in improving effective non-cognitive skill building opportunities and benefits for young people. Silicon Valley Out-of-School-Time Collaborative.

One-Hour Confidence Exercise Can Boost GPA, Study Finds. (2011). An intriguing study out today finds that a one-hour exercise to boost students' confidence can improve the grades of minority college students. This and another recent study showing that coaching can make a difference in whether students complete college raise obvious questions about whether similar weapons could be deployed to help high school students.

Pathways to Progress: Forging Strategies to Broaden Impact. (November 2016) In 2014, the Citi Foundation launched Pathways to Progress, a three-year, $50 million initiative in the United States to help 100,000 low-income youth - ages 16 to 24 - develop workplace skills and leadership experience. This Issue Brief focuses on the organizational level of impact among grantees. Equal Measure.

Pitt Research Takes New Approach to Student Engagement. (2013). New research on student engagement looks beyond completed assignments and attendance, to other measures such as student's emotional and cognitive involvement with course material.

Preparing Youth to Thrive: Promising Practices in Social & Emotional Learning. (January 2016) The Field Guide sheds new light on how programs can embed social and emotional learning (SEL) into any program serving teens. Susan Crown Exchange (SCE).

 

Ready for Work? How Afterschool Programs Can Support Employability Through Social and Emotional Learning. (December 2015) This brief shares how social and emotional learning programs and practices can support the development of these skills and how afterschool and expanded learning settings are an ideal place for this to happen. American Institutes for Research. 

 

Right Reasoning and Right Answers. (2013). According to the author, right answers are a lot less important than being able to think critically. However, statewide exams have become pervasive and they emphasize right answers. This article poses the question: "why should right answers get in the way of right reasoning?"

The Social Group Work Approach: Promoting Individual Growth and Community Building. (2009). This publication describes how social group work methodology enhances youth development programming at the Center for Family Life’s P.S.1 Beacon in Brooklyn. Part of the “Practices to Keep In After-School and Youth Programs” series from the Youth Development Institute.

'Soft Skills' Pushed as Part of College Readiness. (2012). To make it in college, students need to be up for the academic rigor. But that's not all. They also must be able to manage their own time, get along with roommates, and deal with setbacks. Resiliency and grit, along with the ability to communicate and advocate, are all crucial life skills. Yet, experts say, many teenagers lack them, and that's hurting college-completion rates.

Supporting Social and Emotional Development Through Quality Afterschool Programs. (July 2015) This brief shares recent research on how afterschool programs contribute to the development of these competencies, and offers some next step recommendations to both practitioners and researchers. American Institutes for Research. 

Study Finds Social-Skills Teaching Boosts Academics. (2011). From role-playing games for students to parent seminars, teaching social and emotional learning requires a lot of moving parts, but when all the pieces come together such instruction can rival the effectiveness of purely academic interventions to boost student achievement, according to the largest analysis of such programs to date.

Teaching Kids How to Succeed in School. (2013). This report describes how summer learning programs are intentionally structured to support participants' social and emotional development, including their self-confidence, persistence, willingness to try new things, and sense of belonging to the school community.

Three Reasons Why Students May Resist Collaboration. (2012). There are many reasons students may be reluctant to collaborate with their peers, writes Robin Newton, an English education student at East Carolina University. There may be cultural differences or a lack of understanding, or the students may be shy or introverted. Newton writes that collaboration among students will not happen by chance. "Rather, a teacher must know his or her students well enough to understand the ways in which collaboration might be a struggle," Newton writes in this blog post.

What if the Secret to Success Is Failure? (2011). Is Character building - those essential traits of mind and habit, a critical missing piece of the Education system? A headmaster tries to put the concept of character into action in at his school.

What Works for Promoting and Enhancing Positive Social Skills: Lessons from Experimental Evaluations of Programs and Interventions. (2011). This fact sheet reviews 38 rigorously evaluated programs to identify what works to promote social skills among children and adolescents (such as getting along with others, expressing empathy to others, trying to resolve conflicts, and regulating emotions and behaviors).

Why Students Should be Encouraged to Develop Opinions. (2012). Students should be taught to break away from the opinions of their teachers and parents, and develop their own thoughts, writes elementary-school principal Peter DeWitt in this blog post. He writes that students need to be heard, not just spoken to by teachers. "We need to encourage students to create their own opinions so they do not always feel as though they are on the outside looking in," he writes.

Youth Development through Service to Nature: A Study of Student Conservation Association Programs. (June 2016) An assessment of the impact of intensive conservation experiences on 484 SCA members' personal development and readiness for school, work, and engaged civic life. Search Institute.

Top

 

 


 

 

Positive Youth Development

The Best of Both Worlds: Aligning Afterschool Programs with Youth Development Principles and Academic Standards.(2009). This guide from the Sunset Neighborhood Beacon Center (SNBC) documents SNBC’s application of California Department of Education content standards to innovative, project-based learning clubs.

Educating the Whole Child Engaging the Whole School: Guidelines and Resources for Social and Emotional Development and Learning (SEDL) in New York State. (2011). The purpose in issuing voluntary Social and Emotional Development and Learning (SEDL) Guidelines is to offer school districts compelling information, example and evidence of SEDL in elementary and secondary school education programs.

Forward Thinking: Preparing Our Youth for the Coming World. August 2014. This articles provides brief reviews of research-based evidence related to young people and positive youth development. The article includes statistics on educational access and socio-emotional wellbeing experienced by adolescents today. The authors also presented reviews of research on research-based practices directed at youth. Journal of Research on Adolescence.

Foundations for Young Adult Success: A Developmental Framework. (June 2015) The report synthesizes knowledge from the fields of youth development, psychology, sociology, education and the cognitive sciences; it describes what children need to grow and learn, and how adults can foster their development in ways that lead to college and career success, healthy relationships and engaged citizenship. University of Chicago Consortium on Chicago School Research.

 

Guide to Mentoring Boys and Young Men of Color. (2016) The fourth edition of The Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ (Elements) represents the current evidence-based standards for running a safe and effective youth mentoring program. This Guide serves as a supplement to the Elements and includes additional recommended practices focusing on boys and young men of color (BYMOC). My Brother's Keeper Alliance / MENTOR.

Helping Older Youth Succeed Through Expanded Learning Opportunities. (2011). Sustaining older youth's interest in learning is particularly critical given that nearly one in four students fails to graduate from high school on time. Research indicates that regular participation in quality expanded learning opportunities (ELOs) can help keep older youth on a positive academic trajectory and support their successful graduation and transition into college and/or career.

Panel Says Ed. Schools Overlook Developmental Science. (2010). Education programs should more explicitly train teacher candidates in the rudiments of developmental science, and need policy support from states and the federal government to do so, asserts a report released by a panel convened by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education.

Preparing Youth to Thrive: Promising Practices in Social & Emotional Learning. (January 2016) The Field Guide sheds new light on how programs can embed social and emotional learning (SEL) into any program serving teens. Susan Crown Exchange (SCE).

Positive Youth Development Resource Manual .(2006). This document is a concise summary of the ideal setting and environment for Positive Youth Development programming.  It elaborates on the effects of effective youth development for older youth.

Positive Youth Development in the United States: Research Findings on Evaluations of Positive Youth Development Programs. (2004). This article explores the background of Positive Youth Development (PYD) and the most efficient ways to implement elements of  PYD in existing programs. The authors discuss characteristics of effective PYD, as well as research findings on decreases in negative youth behaviors through PYD programming.

Promoting Positive Youth Development Through Out of School-Time Activities: Implications of the Findings from the 4-H Study of Positive Youth Development. (2008). This document presents the results of a 4-H study linking Positive Youth Development (PYD) and Out of School Time (OST).  Findings show that more participation in PYD activities had positive effects, and that practitioners should collaborate with researchers to maximize OST programming results.

Promoting Youth-Adult Collaboration. (2010). This newsletter describes the positive effects of positive youth development when youth are paired with adults.  Two programs in Poland and Chile are presented as examples of youth-adult collaboration and its outcomes: improving communities and increasing youth life skills.  The document includes tangible recommendations for implementing adult-youth partnerships in OST programming.

What Young People Need to Thrive: Leveraging the Strengthening Families Act to Promote Normalcy. (2015) This brief highlights the importance of normalcy to the overall healthy development of young people in foster care. The Annie E. Casey Foundation.

Why and When Peer Prediction is Superior to Self-Prediction. (2012). Sometimes it's easier to make decisions for our friends and others than plan our own lives. We are able to make a more objective choice. In this research study, Helzer & Dunning's research found 'peer-prediction' to be much more accurate than 'self-prediction' in estimating whether we could achieve a particular goal.

Youth Development through Service to Nature: A Study of Student Conservation Association Programs. (June 2016) An assessment of the impact of intensive conservation experiences on 484 SCA members' personal development and readiness for school, work, and engaged civic life. Search Institute.

Top

 

 


 

 

Youth Leadership and Governance

Get Youth on Board! A Toolkit for Stakeholder Collaboration and Youth Promotion. (2009). This toolkit is based on an integrated and participatory approach aimed at bringing together governmental and non-governmental stakeholders working with young people on a local level for the joint implementation of youth services and activities.

An Important Life Lesson: The Silver Lining of Afterschool Funding Fights. September 2014. Patrick Pinchinat, Beacon Director at the Queens Community House in NYC, invited afterschool youth to be part of advocacy work. Youth used social media to coordinate community events, testified at council hearings, and spoke at rallies. Youth Today.

empowerME4Life. (2013) A fun and practical 8-session healthy living course equipping kids ages 8-12 with new attitudes, skills and knowledge about eating better and moving more-for life. Alliance for a Healthier Generation.

From Membership to Leadership: The Pathways to Leadership Program. (2009). This article highlights the Beacon Program and its methods of attracting youth and developing them into leaders.  Beacon’s Pathways to Leadership program targets middle school students and develops their life skills and professional skills.

Pathways to College and to Social Justice Leadership: The University Community Collaborative of Philadelphia (UCCP).(2012). To counter the crisis in leadership these trends represent and to give youth voice in issues that affect them, the UCCP created an infrastructure for fostering public-minded, equitable, and just leadership among youth while inspiring change in other institutions.

Progressive Youth Leadership Development: Strengthening opportunities for older youth in Philadelphia. (2008)This is a summary and reflection of youth leadership programs in Philadelphia. Several community partners, universities, and youth collaborated to identify effective ways of engaging older youth who are less likely to voluntarily participate in programming.

Promoting Active Youth Citizenship. (2007). The December issue of “Field Notes,” a publication from International Youth Foundation, demonstrates that youth citizenship is vital for creating better citizens that eventually mentor and volunteer within their own communities.  There are many positive outcomes for encouraging youth citizenship, the most prominent being encouraging youth to be more active citizens in their domestic and international communities.

Strategies for Incorporating Youth Voice into Program Design: The Importance of Youth Leadership, Responsibility, Choice, and Autonomy. (March 2016) This brief presents findings from research to understand the experiences of Boston youth in out-of-school time programming in the areas of youth leadership and responsibility, and choice and autonomy. Practical strategies to engage youth in these areas are included. Boston After School & Beyond.

Student Choice: An Important Step for Meaningful Technology Integration. ( 2011). Sometimes students would share their work if there was extra time, but for the most part, there was a familiar pattern: Research and use one program to show what was learned, then submit to teacher. For teachers nervous about integrating technology, these types of lessons are a good start to get comfortable using technology with students. We learn how to design a lesson using the technology and manage/problem solve all the details with implementing the activity with real kids.

A Teacher's Guide to Engaging a New Generation of Anti-Hunger Leaders. (2013) YSA encourages educators to browse through the rich experiences that its Semester of Service teachers have shared in this guide. Readers can build these experiences into their own teaching, engage students in addressing this issue, and begin to develop a plan of action. Youth Service America.

 

Using Action Research to Engage Youth in Improving OST Programming. (2015) To build a culture of participation, out-of-school time (OST) providers, educators, planners, and advocacy groups need to partner with youth, engaging them in projects that are meaningful to them, to the adults who support them, and to their communities. Afterschool Matters.

 

A Youth Development Approach to Evaluation. (2015) This article raises up critical participatory action research and youth participatory evaluation as possible answers to the challenge of producing "evidence-based" outcomes. Afterschool Matters.

 

Youth Development through Service to Nature: A Study of Student Conservation Association Programs. (June 2016) An assessment of the impact of intensive conservation experiences on 484 SCA members' personal development and readiness for school, work, and engaged civic life. Search Institute.

Top